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Monday, February 12th, 2018
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
Processes and pathways mediating the experience of social anxiety and negative rumination.

PubMed

 

Resource

Behaviour research and therapy Feb ; 103()

Authors

Modini M1; Rapee RM2; Abbott MJ3;

Author Information
  • 1Clinical Psychology Unit, School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
  • 2Centre for Emotional Health, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
  • 3Clinical Psychology Unit, School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: maree.abbott@sydney.edu.au.

Abstract

Negative rumination in social anxiety disorder (SAD) occurs in anticipation of a social event (pre-event rumination) and in its aftermath (post-event rumination). Both are proposed to be key maintaining factors of the vicious cycle of social anxiety. Despite this, there is a dearth of research investigating the processes that mediate the relationship between social anxiety and pre-event rumination and uncertainty regarding the cognitive and attentional processes that mediate the relationship between social anxiety and post-event rumination. To investigate this further, the current study utilised a clinical sample of participants with SAD to determine the hypothesised mediators of a social anxiety and pre-event model (N = 239) and a social anxiety and post-event rumination model (N = 216). Results from path analyses were broadly consistent with cognitive models of SAD that posit several interrelated processes mediate the relationship between social anxiety and pre- and post-event rumination. Results also indicated slightly different processes showed stronger prediction of pre-event rumination (i.e., biased performance appraisals) and post-event rumination (i.e., negative attentional focus). Treatment recommendations that aim to address the maladaptive role of negative rumination in social anxiety are made in keeping with the inter-connected and dynamic role played by cognitive and attentional processes in heightening social anxiety.

Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID

29427902

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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