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Monday, February 12th, 2018
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
Traffic related air pollution and development and persistence of asthma and low lung function.

PubMed

 

Resource

Environment international Feb ; 113()

Authors

Bowatte G1; Lodge CJ2; Knibbs LD3; Erbas B4; Perret JL5; Jalaludin B6; Morgan GG7; Bui DS8; Giles GG9; Hamilton GS10; Wood-Baker R11; Thomas P12; Thompson BR13; Matheson MC14; Abramson MJ15; Walters EH16; Dharmage SC17;

Author Information
  • 1Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population & Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri Lanka.
  • 2Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population & Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 3School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
  • 4School of Psychology & Public Health, Department of Public Health, Latrobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 5Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population & Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 6Health People and Places Unit, South Western Sydney Local Health District, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
  • 7University Centre for Rural Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
  • 8Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population & Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 9Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population & Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Cancer Epidemiology Center, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Australia; School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 10Monash Lung and Sleep, Monash Health, Melbourne, Australia; School of Clinical Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 11School of Medicine, University of Tasmania Medical School, Hobart, Australia.
  • 12POWHCS & IIRC, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
  • 13Allergy Immunology and Respiratory Medicine, Alfred Health, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 14Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population & Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 15School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
  • 16NHMRC CRE, University of Tasmania Medical School, Hobart, Australia.
  • 17Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population & Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: s.dharmage@unimelb.edu.au.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Traffic Related Air Pollution (TRAP) exposure is known to exacerbate existing respiratory diseases. We investigated longer term effects of TRAP exposure for individuals with or without existing asthma, and with or without lower lung function.

METHODS: Associations between TRAP exposure and asthma (n = 689) and lung function (n = 599) were investigated in the prospective Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study (TAHS). TRAP exposure at age 45 years was measured using two methods based on residential address: mean annual NO2 exposure; and distance to nearest major road. Adjusted multinomial logistic regression was used to model the association between exposure to TRAP at 45 years and changes in asthma and lung function, using three follow ups of TAHS (45, 50 and 53 years).

RESULTS: For those who never had asthma by 45, living <200 m from a major road was associated with increased odds of new asthma that persisted from 50 to 53 years (adjusted Odds Ratio [aOR] 5.20; 95% CI 1.07, 25.4). Asthmatic participants at 45 had an increased risk of persistent asthma up to 53 years if they were living <200 m from a major road, compared with asthmatic participants living >200 m from a major road (aOR = 5.21; 95% CI 1.54, 17.6).

CONCLUSION: For middle aged adults, living <200 m for a major road (a marker of TRAP exposure) influences both the development and persistence of asthma. These findings have public health implications for asthma prevention strategies in primary and secondary settings.

Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PMID

29427878

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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