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Monday, February 12th, 2018
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
An assessment of the relationship of physical activity, obesity, and chronic diseases/conditions between active/obese and sedentary/ normal weight American women in a national sample.

PubMed

 

Resource

Public health Feb ; 156()

Authors

Pharr JR1; Coughenour CA2; Bungum TJ3;

Author Information
  • 1University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Community Health Sciences, 4505 S, Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA. Electronic address: Jennifer.pharr@unlv.edu.
  • 2University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Community Health Sciences, 4505 S, Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.
  • 3University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Community Health Sciences, 4505 S, Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Obesity and physical inactivity are associated with increased rates of chronic diseases and conditions. However, the 'fit but fat' theory posits that cardiopulmonary fitness (or physical activity) can mitigate risks to health associated with obesity. The purpose of this study was to compare chronic diseases and conditions of highly active/obese women with inactive/normal weight women.

STUDY DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of the 2015 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data.

METHODS: Weighted descriptive statistics were performed to describe the demographic characteristics of the two groups. We calculated odds ratios and adjusted odds ratios for chronic diseases and conditions comparing highly active/obese women with inactive/normal weight women.

RESULTS: Highly active/obese women were more likely to report risk factors (hypertension, high cholesterol, and diabetes) for coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) than inactive/normal weight women; however, they did not have increased rates of CVD, CHD, or heart attack and had decreased risk for stroke. Highly active/obese women had increased risk for asthma, arthritis, and depression, but not for cancer, kidney disease, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

CONCLUSIONS: Highly active/obese women appear to be staving off the actual development of CHD and CVD; however, further research is needed to understand the long-term health benefits of physical activity among obese women.

Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID

29427767

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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