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Thursday, September 14th, 2017
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
Changes in physical activity after total hip or knee arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis of 6 and 12 month outcomes.

PubMed

 

Resource

Arthritis care & research 2017 Sep 12; ()

Authors

Hammett T1; Simonian A2; Austin M3; Butler R4; Allen KD5; Ledbetter L6; Goode AP7;

Author Information
  • 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, 2200 W. Main St., Suite B-230, Durham, NC, 27708.
  • 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, 2200 W. Main St., Suite B-230, Durham, NC, 27708.
  • 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, 2200 W. Main St., Suite B-230, Durham, NC, 27708.
  • 4Performance Department, St. Louis Cardinals, 4795 University Blvd, Jupiter, FL, 33458.
  • 5Department of Medicine, Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC.
  • 6Duke University, Medical Center Library, Durham, North Carolina, USA, 27708.
  • 7Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, 2200 W. Main St., Suite B-230, Durham, NC, 27708.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the extent to which physical activity (PA) changes following total knee or hip joint replacement relative to pain, physical function and quality of life. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on changes in PA relative to pain, quality of life and physical function after total knee or hip joint replacement.

METHODS: We searched PubMed (Medline), Embase and Cinahl, for peer-reviewed, English-language cohort studies measuring PA with an accelerometer from pre-surgery to post-surgery. Random-effects models were used to produce standardized mean differences (SMDs) for PA, quality of life, pain, and physical function outcomes. Heterogeneity was measured with I(2) .

RESULTS: Seven studies (336 participants) met eligibility criteria. No significant increase in PA was found at 6-months (SMD 0.14; 95% CI -0.05 to 0.34; I(2) =0%) and a small-moderate significant effect was found for increasing PA at 12-months (SMD 0.43; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.64; I(2) =0%). Large improvements at 6-months in physical function (SMD 0.97; 95% CI 0.12 to 1.82; I(2) =92.3%), pain (SMD -1.47; 95% CI -2.28 to -0.65; I(2) =91.6%), and quality of life (SMD 1.02; 95% CI 0.30 to 1.74; I(2) =83.2%) were found.

CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity did not change at 6-months and a small-moderate improvement was found at 12-months post-surgery, despite large improvements in quality of life, pain, and physical function. Reasons for the lack of increased PA are unknown but may be behavioral in nature as sedentary lifestyle is difficult to change. Changing sedentary behavior should be a future focus among this subgroup. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID

28898559

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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