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Tuesday, June 27th, 2017
Table of Contents

1 Introduction
5 PMID
 [F] Diseases Research  / PubMed Research Articles  /
Longitudinal investigation into implicit stigma of epilepsy among Japanese medical students before and after mass media coverage of car accidents associated with people with epilepsy.

PubMed

 

Resource

Epilepsy & behavior : E&B 2017 Jun 17; 73()

Authors

Nagamori C1; Hara K2; Ohta K3; Akaza M4; Sumi Y5;

Author Information
  • 1Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan.
  • 2Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan; Hara Clinic, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan. Electronic address: hrkebi@tmd.ac.jp.
  • 3Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan; Onda Daini Hospital, Matsudo, Chiba, Japan.
  • 4Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan.
  • 5Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Public attitudes and stigma toward epilepsy may limit patient motivation for treatment and participation in social activities. Stigma research requiring individuals to report personal beliefs is useful but is subject to social desirability bias. Self-reporting methods often do not capture implicit attitudes; therefore, in this study, implicit stigma was measured using the implicit association test (IAT), which is a word sorting task to minimize this bias. Recently, in Japan, several serious car accidents caused by people with epilepsy (PWE) resulted in pedestrian fatalities. Traffic accidents involving PWE have been reported extensively and repeatedly in the media since 2011. The present study aimed to examine differences in implicit stigma toward epilepsy among medical students in 2010, 2013, and 2016.

METHODS: We recruited 41 medical students in 2010, 44 medical students in 2013 and 42 medical students in 2016. We investigated the strength of conceptual associations between the words "Epilepsy" or "Hypertension", and "Safety" or "Danger" in the IAT.

RESULTS: The association between the words "Epilepsy" and "Danger" was stronger in 2013 compared with that in 2010; however, the association was weaker in 2016 compared with that in 2013. There was no significant difference between 2010 and 2016.

CONCLUSION: The change in IAT results between 2010 and 2013 might be due to the traffic accident involving PWE in Japan. However, the result in 2016 might indicate that the implicit attitudes toward epilepsy were improved to the same level as those in 2010.

Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID

28623756

Others

Publication Type: Journal Article


This article is licensed under the the National Library of Medicine License. It uses material from the PubMed National Library of Medicine Data.


Last Modified:   2016-03-27


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